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Live animals

Chicken hatching eggs

Country: New Zealand

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Importing country requirements

It is the exporter's responsibility to ensure that the animal meets the importing country requirements.

Information about the process required to import poultry hatching eggs (chicken, duck and turkey) into New Zealand can be found at the New Zealand government's Steps to importing avian hatching eggs.

Note: Where an importing country issues an import permit, the exporter must ensure the animal meets any requirements in the permit.

Health requirements

Health certificate

Veterinary health certificate attestations for importation of chicken hatching eggs into New Zealand.

General

  1. The eggs for export to New Zealand were sourced from a Department of Agriculture approved premises.
  2. The eggs for export to New Zealand were derived from parent flocks kept in accordance with the OIE Code Chapter on Biosecurity Procedures in Poultry Production. The parent flocks were kept isolated from all other birds as described in this OIE Code Chapter.

Inspection

  1. The parent flocks were inspected by a registered veterinarian within 28 days of commencement of collection of eggs for export and were found to be free of clinical evidence of disease. This inspection was undertaken while the birds were housed in the premises where egg collection took place.
  2. The consignment was inspected by a registered veterinarian within 72 hours of export for compliance verification. The chicken hatching eggs were sealed under the supervision of the registered veterinarian, and the unique seal number and date of sealing is recorded on this veterinary certificate.

Specific requirements for identified risk organisms

  1. For avian influenza:
    1. The eggs for export were derived from parent flocks not vaccinated for avian influenza.
    2. Either (delete inapplicable):
      1. For at least 21 days prior to egg collection, and during egg collection, the Australian State or Territory of origin of the source flocks has been free from high pathogenicity avian influenza as defined by the OIE. Avian influenza is a notifiable disease in Australia and no cases have been reported in the State or Territory of origin of the source flocks since at least 21 days prior to commencement of egg collection;
        OR
      2. The eggs for export were derived from parent flocks that tested negative to infection with avian influenza by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), virus isolation with pathogenicity testing, or ELISA (delete inapplicable) within 21 days prior to the commencement of egg collection and at a maximum of 21-day intervals during the egg collection period. Sampling of parent birds was randomised and representative of the flock from which the eggs were collected. The sample size was sufficient to give 95% confidence of detecting avian influenza at 5% prevalence in the flock.
  2. For avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV), Newcastle disease (ND):
    1. The eggs for export were derived from parent flocks with a vaccination status of either (delete inapplicable):
      1. Not vaccinated for APMV-1;
        OR
      2. Vaccinated for APMV-1 using an inactivated vaccine*;
        OR
      3. Vaccinated with live lentogenic vaccine/s for APMV-1 (the master seed virus of the vaccine used has an intracerebral pathogenicity index <0.4)*.
        OR
      4. Vaccinated for APMV-1 using inactivated and live lentogenic vaccines (the master seed virus of the vaccine used has an intracerebral pathogenicity index <0.4) in accordance with an APMV-1 vaccination program*.

        *If ii), iii) or iv) was selected, vaccination records including the date of administration and name and nature of vaccination is attached to this certificate.
    2. Either:
      1. For at least 21 days prior to egg collection, and during egg collection, the Australian State or Territory of origin of the source flocks has been free from Newcastle disease as defined by the OIE;
        OR
      2. The eggs for export were derived from parent flocks that tested negative to infection with APMV-1 by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) or ELISA (delete inapplicable) within 21 days prior to the commencement of egg collection and at a maximum of 21 day intervals during the egg collection period. Sampling of parent birds was randomised and representative of the flock from which the eggs were collected. The sample size was sufficient to give 95% confidence of detecting APMV-1 at 5% prevalence in the flock.
  3. For Salmonellae spp.
    1. For Salmonella Pullorum and Salmonella Gallinarum, either:
      1. The parent flocks from which the eggs for export were derived are part of a Salmonella accreditation program for Salmonella Pullorum and have a free status for both Salmonella Pullorum and Salmonella Gallinarum;
        OR
      2. The parent flocks from which the eggs for export were derived tested negative for Salmonella Pullorum and Salmonella Gallinarum by serum agglutination tests at least twice in the six months prior to export, including once within 30 days of export. Sampling of birds from the parent flocks was randomised and representative of the flock from which the eggs were collected. The sample size was sufficient to give 95% confidence of detecting Salmonella Pullorum and Salmonella Gallinarum at 5% prevalence in the flock.
    2. For Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, either:
      1. The parent flocks from which the eggs for export were derived are part of a Salmonella accreditation program for Salmonella enteritidis and have a free status for both Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium;
        OR
      2. The housing of the parent flocks from which the eggs for export were derived has been microbiologically tested for Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella enteritidis. At least five samples per airspace were tested at least twice in the six months prior to export, including once within 30 days of export. No evidence of Salmonella Typhimurium or Salmonella enteritidis was detected.
  4. Where laboratory testing was performed:
    1. Testing was conducted at a National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA) accredited laboratory.
    2. Laboratory and other diagnostic tests used on birds were those prescribed for that disease in the OIE Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals (Manual) for use during international trade, and/or those approved by the New Zealand Ministry of Primary Industry (MPI).
    3. Laboratory samples were collected under the supervision of a registered veterinarian, processed and stored as recommended in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Code) and/or as specified by MPI.
    4. Original laboratory reports; copies of laboratory reports endorsed by an Official Veterinarian; or a tabulated summary of laboratory results endorsed by an Official Veterinarian are attached, including details of:
      1. the relevant risk organism tested for
      2. sample size
      3. dates of sample collection
      4. test type
      5. test result.

Treatment, packaging and transportation

  1. The eggs were clean when collected, unwashed and have intact (uncracked) shells. They were collected separately from dirty and broken or cracked eggs. The eggs were cleaned and sanitised as soon as possible after collection using an approved sanitising agent, in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

Details of the treatment are to be attached to the certificate.

  1. The eggs were placed in new and clean packaging that was sealed using tamper-evident seals before departure.
  2. The details of transport and arrival times of the eggs have been supplied to a New Zealand Inspector and/or Official Veterinarian at the port of entry not less than 7 days in advance of importation.
  3. The transport containers meet the design and species specification published in the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Live Animals Regulations (LAR), unless otherwise agreed by MPI. If wooden containers are used, these comply with New Zealand import requirements for woodware.
  4. The vehicle in which the eggs were transported to the port of departure was cleaned and disinfected. The date of treatment, the chemical(s) used, and the active ingredients are attached to this certificate.
  5. During transport to the port of departure the hatching eggs were not transported or stored with animals not of equivalent health status. Transit and/or stopovers en route to New Zealand have been arranged so that the hatching eggs will not contact animals that are not of equivalent health status.
  6. Eggs transiting a third country en route to New Zealand have received MPI approval prior to export.

Other requirements

Transport requirements

New Zealand has particular requirements for packaging and transporting chicken hatching eggs.

Return to australia

If your animal is returning to Australia, you should make yourself familiar with Australia's requirements for importing live animals into Australia. This is important as your animal may have been exposed to diseases that do not occur in Australia.

Basis of micor entry

Importing country website and information. Health certificate attestations agreed 28 February 2020.

Entry last reviewed 11 May 2020

Latest updates

4608|09/10/2020|20211119|5632|NoSC
Last updated: 3/07/2022 11:50 PMCreated: 3/02/2020 2:23 PM